Networking Definitions

This glossary explains the meaning of key words and phrases that information technology (IT) and business professionals use when discussing networking and related software products. You can find additional definitions by visiting WhatIs.com or using the search box below.

  • #

    6to4

    6to4 is a tunneling mechanism used to transfer IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) packets over an IPv4 infrastructure, typically the IPv4 Internet. The 6to4 mechanism was created to support coexistence of both versions during the transition to IPv6, which is expected to take years. (Continued)

  • 802.11a

    802.11a is one of several specifications in the 802.11 family applicable to wireless local area networks (wireless LANs or WLANs).

  • 802.11s

    802.11s is a proposed amendment to the 802.11 wireless networking standards that will provide a vendor-neutral way to build wireless mesh networks over wireless LAN (WLAN) products.

  • 802.3

    802.3 is a standard specification for Ethernet, a method of physical communication in a local area network (LAN), which is maintained by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

  • streaming network telemetry

    Streaming network telemetry is a real-time data collection service in which network devices such as routers, switches and firewalls continuously push network health data and interface measurements to a centralized collector.

  • A

    A-Law

    A-Law is the standard codec (compression/decompression) algorithm for pulse code modulation (PCM) from the ITU-T (the Telecommunication Standardization Sector of the International Telecommunications Union).

  • AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol)

    AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol) is a way to map between the physical hardware addresses of computers, such as those known to an Ethernet or token ring local area network, and their temporarily assigned AppleTalk network addresses.

  • AAUI (Apple attachment unit interface)

    An AAUI (Apple attachment unit interface) is the 14- or 15-pin port or connection interface on earlier models of Macintosh computers that allowed it to be connected by a short interface cable (or "transceiver") to an Ethernet cable.

  • acceleration hardware

    Acceleration hardware is a general term that refers to devices that speed up data communications, storage and retrieval, encryption and decryption, mathematical operations, graphics, and Web page viewing. Acceleration hardware can consist of an individual integrated circuit (also called an IC or chip), a printed circuit card, or a self-contained system.

  • access point base station

    Access point base station is the original term for what is now known as a femtocell.

  • ACK

    In some digital communication protocols, ACK is the name of a signal that data has been received successfully (for example, with an acceptable number of errors).

  • acoustic coupler

    An acoustic coupler is a hardware device that enables a modem (a device that converts signals from analog to digital and from digital back to analog) to connect to a voice circuit.

  • ACTA (America's Carriers Telecommunications Association)

    ACTA (America's Carriers Telecommunications Association) is a lobbying organization for over 165 small long-distance telephone carrier companies.

  • active network

    An active network is a network in which the nodes are programmed to perform custom operations on the messages that pass through the node.

  • ACTS (Automatic Coin Telephone System)

    ACTS (Automatic Coin Telephone System) is a public coin-operated telephone service that completes a variety of phone calls, times the calls, and collects payment without the aid of an operator.

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