Network management Definitions

  • C

    Constellation

    Constellation was the early name for the Communicator browser and related programs from Netscape Communications.

  • CRC-4 (Cyclic Redundancy Check 4)

    CRC-4 (Cyclic Redundancy Check 4) is a form of cyclic redundancy checking (a method of checking for errors in transmitted data) that is used on E-1 trunk lines.

  • crosstalk

    Crosstalk is a disturbance caused by the electric or magnetic fields of one telecommunication signal affecting a signal in an adjacent circuit.

  • cyclic redundancy checking

    Cyclic redundancy checking is a method of checking for errors in data that has been transmitted on a communications link.

  • D

    deep packet inspection (DPI)

    Deep packet inspection (DPI) is an advanced method of examining and managing network traffic.

  • device relationship management (DRM)

    Device relationship management (DRM) is enterprise software that enables the monitoring, managing, and servicing of intelligent devices over the Internet.

  • E

    edge device

    An edge device is any piece of hardware that controls data flow at the boundary between two networks.

  • F

    fault management

    Fault management is the component of network management concerned with detecting, isolating and resolving problems.

  • FCAPS (fault-management, configuration, accounting, performance, and security)

    FCAPS is a network management framework created by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). FCAPS categorizes the working objectives of network management into five levels. The five levels are:  fault-management (F), the configuration level (C), the accounting level (A), the performance level (P) and the security level (S).

  • FECN/BECN (forward explicit congestion notification/backward explicit congestion notification)

    In a frame relay network, FECN (forward explicit congestion notification) is a header bit transmitted by the source (sending) terminal requesting that the destination (receiving) terminal slow down its requests for data.

  • firehose effect

    A firehose effect occurs in a network when the source (transmitting) computer or terminal sends data too fast for a destination (receiving) computer or terminal to deal with it. The term comes from the analogy between a data stream and the flow of water through the heavy hose used in fighting fire.

  • G

    gigabit

    In data communications, a gigabit is one billion bits, or 1,000,000,000 (that is, 10^9) bits. It's commonly used for measuring the amount of data that is transferred in a second between two telecommunication points.

  • graceful degradation

    Graceful degradation is the ability of a computer, machine, electronic system or network to maintain limited functionality even when a large portion of it has been destroyed or rendered inoperative. The purpose of graceful degradation is to prevent catastrophic failure... (Continued)

  • green route

    A green route is one of three categories of Internet route states defined by the Policy Analysis of Internet Routing (PAIR) project, an initiative dedicated to the development of tools that ISPs (Internet service providers), network operators, and end users can use to troubleshoot Internet routing and policy problems.

  • I

    infranet

    The infranet is a proposed universal, public, packet-switched supplement to the Internet for businesses and high-demand private users that would provide guaranteed security, reliability, and quality of service (QoS).

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