D - Definitions

  • D

    D-channel

    In the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the D-channel is the channel that carries control and signalling information.

  • daisy chain

    A daisy chain is an interconnection of computer devices, peripherals, or network nodes in series, one after another. It is the computer equivalent of a series electrical circuit.

  • dark fiber

    Dark fiber is optical fiber infrastructure (cabling and repeaters) that is currently in place but is not being used.

  • darknet

    A darknet is a routed allocation of IP address space that is not discoverable by any usual means.

  • DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency)

    DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) is the independent research branch of the U.S. Department of Defense that funded a project that in time was to lead to the creation of the Internet.

  • DARPANET

    DARPANET (or DARPANet) is a term sometimes used for the ARPANET, the early network from which today's Internet evolved.

  • data center interconnect (DCI)

    Data center interconnect (DCI) is a segment of the networking market that focuses on the technology used to link two or more data centers so the facilities can share resources. There are many options for DCI connectivity and selecting the right one depends upon a wide range of variables, including the location of the data centers, the distance between data centers, bandwidth and availability requirements, the capabilities of local service providers and security concerns.

  • data link control (DLC)

    DLC also is an abbreviation for digital loop carrier.

  • data link layer

    The Data-Link Layer is the protocol layer in a program that handles the moving of data in and out across a physical link in a network.

  • data plane (DP)

    The data plane (sometimes known as the user plane, forwarding plane, carrier plane or bearer plane) is the part of a network that carries user traffic.

  • data streaming

    Data streaming is the continuous transfer of data at a steady, high-speed rate. To facilitate the need for real-time analytics from disparate data sources, many companies have replaced traditional batch processing with streaming data architectures that can accommodate batch processing.

  • Data-Link layer

    The data link layer is the protocol layer in a program that handles the moving of data into and out of a physical link in a network.

  • datagram

    A datagram is, to quote the Internet's Request for Comments 1594, "a self-contained, independent entity of data carrying sufficient information to be routed from the source to the destination computer without reliance on earlier exchanges between this source and destination computer and the transporting network."

  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment)

    In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.

  • DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications)

    Unlike the analog cordless phones you may have in your home, DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) is a digital wireless telephone technology that is expected to make cordless phones much more common in both businesses and homes in the future.

  • deep packet inspection (DPI)

    Deep packet inspection (DPI) is an advanced method of examining and managing network traffic.

  • delay-tolerant network

    A delay-tolerant network is a network designed to operate effectively over extreme distances such as those encountered in space communications or on an interplanetary scale... (Continued)

  • demarc (demarcation point)

    A demarc (an abbreviation for demarcation point) marks the point where communications facilities owned by one organization interface with that of another organization.

  • DEN (Directory-Enabled Networking)

    Directory-Enabled Networking (DEN) is an industry-standard initiative and specification for how to construct and store information about a network's users, applications, and data in a central directory.

  • dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM)

    Dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) is a technology that puts together -- multiplexes -- data signals from different sources so they can share a single optical fiber pair while maintaining complete separation of the data streams.

  • device relationship management (DRM)

    Device relationship management (DRM) is enterprise software that enables the monitoring, managing, and servicing of intelligent devices over the Internet.

  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)

    DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a network management protocol used to dynamically assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address to any device, or node, on a network so they can communicate using IP.

  • dial-up

    Dial-up pertains to a telephone connection in a system of many lines shared by many users.

  • Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS)

    DNIS (Dialed Number Identification Service) is a telephone service that identifies for the receiver of a call the number that the caller dialed.

  • digital loop carrier (DLC)

    DLC also is an abbreviation for Data Link Control.

  • Digital Powerline (DPL)

    Digital Powerline (DPL) technology provides the transmission of data to users over the same lines that bring electric power to homes and businesses.

  • digital switch

    A digital switch is a device that handles digital signals generated at or passed through a telephone company central office and forwards them across the company's backbone network.

  • Direct Access File System (DAFS)

    Direct Access File System (DAFS) is a network file system, similar to Network File System (NFS) and Common Internet File System (CIFS), that allows applications to transfer data while bypassing operating system control, buffering, and network protocol operations that can bottleneck throughput.

  • Direct Outward Dialing (DOD)

    Direct Outward Dialing (DOD) is a service of a local phone company (or local exchange carrier) that allows subscribers within a company's private branch exchange (PBX) system to connect to outside lines directly.

  • direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) or direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA)

    Direct sequence spread spectrum, also known as direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA), is one of two approaches to spread spectrum modulation for digital signal transmission over the airwaves.

  • discrete multitone (DMT)

    Discrete multitone (DMT) is a method of separating a Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) signal so that the usable frequency range is separated into 256 frequency bands (or channels) of 4.3125 KHz each.

  • disruption-tolerant network (DTN)

    A disruption-tolerant network (DTN) is a network designed so that temporary or intermittent communications problems, limitations and anomalies have the least possible adverse impact... (Continued)

  • Distributed Control Plane Architecture (DCPA)

    A Distributed Control Plane Architecture (DCPA) is a network architecture that makes it possible to allocate control protocol functions across multiple processor levels in the network system.

  • distributed virtual switch

    A distributed virtual switch is an abstract representation of multiple hosts defining the same name, network policy and port group.

  • distributive numerical control (DNC)

    Distributive numerical control (DNC) is a technology that allows a single computer to be networked with one or more machines that use computer numerical control (CNC).

  • DOCSIS (Data Over Cable Service Interface Specifications)

    Now known as CableLabs Certified Cable Modems, DOCSIS (Data Over Cable Service Interface Specifications) is a standard interface for cable modems, the devices that handle incoming and outgoing data signals between a cable TV operator and a personal or business computer or television set.

  • domain name system (DNS)

    The domain name system (DNS) is a naming database in which internet domain names are located and translated into internet protocol (IP) addresses.

  • DoPa (DoCoMo Packet Transmission)

    DoPa (DoCoMo Packet Transmission) is a packet-switched network service developed by NTT DoCoMo in Japan for Internet connection from mobile devices.

  • DOVE (IBM DOVE)

    IBM Dove (Distributed Overlay Virtual Ethernet) is an architecture that allows a network engineer to abstract the physical network infrastructure from hypervisor hosts and make network changes in software rather than hardware.

  • downloading

    Downloading is the transmission of a file from one computer system to another, usually smaller computer system.

  • downstream

    This term should not be confused with downlink.

  • DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer)

    A DSLAM (Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer) is a network device, usually at a telephone company central office, that receives signals from multiple customer Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) connections and puts the signals on a high-speed backbone line using multiplexing techniques.

  • DTE (Data Terminal Equipment)

    In computer data transmission, DTE (Data Terminal Equipment) is the RS-232C interface that a computer uses to exchange data with a modem or other serial device.

  • DTMF (dual tone multi frequency)

    DTMF (dual tone multi frequency) is the signal to the phone company that you generate when you press an ordinary telephone's touch keys.

  • DTTV (digital terrestrial television)

    DTTV (digital terrestrial television, sometimes also abbreviated DTT) is digital television (DTV) broadcast entirely over earthbound circuits.

  • dumb network

    A dumb network is one that provides the physical interconnection between nodes but not much processing to support signaling.

  • duplex

    In telecommunication, duplex communication means that both ends of the communication can send and receive signals at the same time.

  • DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol)

    DVMRP (Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol) is the oldest routing protocol that has been used to support multicast data transmission over networks.

  • dynamic and static

    In general, dynamic means energetic, capable of action and/or change, or forceful, while static means stationary or fixed.

  • Dynamic ARP Inspection (DAI)

    Dynamic ARP Inspection (DAI) is a security feature that verifies address resolution protocol (ARP) requests and responses in a network.

  • dynamic multipoint VPN (DMVPN)

    A dynamic multipoint virtual private network (DMVPN) is a secure network that exchanges data between sites without needing to pass traffic through an organization's headquarter VPN server or router.

  • dynamic packet filter

    A dynamic packet filter is a firewall facility that can monitor the state of active connections and use this information to determine which network packets to allow through the firewall.

  • dynamic port numbers (private port numbers)

    The dynamic port numbers (also known as the private port numbers) are the port numbers that are available for use by any application to use in communicating with any other application, using the Internet's Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or the User Datagram Protocol (UDP).

  • Dynamic Source Routing (DSR)

    Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) is a self-maintaining routing protocol for wireless networks. The protocol can also function with cellular telephone systems and mobile networks with up to about 200 nodes. A Dynamic Source Routing network can configure and organize itself independently of oversight by human administrators.

  • dynamic spectrum access (dynamic spectrum management)

    Dynamic spectrum access (DSA), also referred to as dynamic spectrum management (DSM), is a set of spectrum utilization techniques that adjusts frequency in real time based on fluctuating circumstances.

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