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Access "Is IT operational efficiency sexy enough to entice investment?"

Rivka Gewirtz Little Published: 07 Oct 2013

What do software-defined networking (SDN) and unified communications (UC) have in common? That question sounds like the beginning of a bad joke -- or worse, a press release trying to convince us that SDN is the next UC game-changer. But it's neither. There is an important commonality in SDN and UC -- both are technologies that promise operational efficiency in return for hefty capital investment. But in both cases, that efficiency is not so easy to measure and prove -- they don't offer a clear return on investment. This makes it difficult to convince C-level execs to invest in these technologies. What's more, both SDN and UC are constantly evolving, so it can be difficult for engineers and network managers to know which vendor strategy to trust -- or to know how long to wait for the technology to mature. In this issue of Network Evolution, we look at important technology developments in both UC and SDN, and we explore the difficulty in deciphering when it's time to invest. Nemertes Research vice president and service director Irwin Lazar outlines five UC ... Access >>>

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