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Network Evolution - June 2014 Vol.5 / No. 4

The average person carries three mobile devices, according to an informal poll conducted last year by Sophos Labs. While Kindles and Fitbits probably aren't making their way onto corporate wireless LANs (WLANs), more enterprises must provide wireless connectivity for users' smartphones, tablets and other work-related mobile devices. Consequently, networking pros need to consider not just user density but also device density in their wireless network designs. You may only support 50 users, but if the number of devices they carry doubles or triples, they can overwhelm a conservatively designed WLAN.

In this issue of Network Evolution, find out how several networking pros are handling high-density wireless. We also explore the future of MPLS and whether basic Internet can replace it at the branch. And finally, Microsoft Lync experts and users weigh in on whether the unified communications (UC) platform is finally ready to take the place of legacy PBXs.   Access >>>

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