Networking Definitions

  • A

    American Wire Gauge (AWG)

    American Wire Gauge (AWG) is a U.S. standard set of non-ferrous wire conductor sizes.

  • AMTOR (amateur teleprinting over radio)

    AMTOR (amateur teleprinting over radio) is a digital communications method used by radio amateurs, in which the frequency of errors is reduced by handshaking or character repetition.

  • anti-replay protocol

    The anti-replay protocol is part of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) standard.

  • anycast

    In Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6), anycast is communication between a single sender and the nearest of several receivers in a group. The term exists in contradistinction to multicast, communication between a single sender and multiple receivers, and unicast, communication between a single sender and a single receiver in a network.

  • APPC (Advanced Program-to-Program Communication or LU 6.2)

    APPC (Advanced Program-to-Program Communication, sometimes called LU 6.2) is a communication protocol and programming interface standard that operates in the presentation layer and the session layer of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model.

  • Appleshare

    The AppleShare protocol is a communications protocol from Apple Computer that allows client applications in a computer to exchange files with and request services from server programs in a computer network.

  • AppleTalk

    AppleTalk is a set of local area network communication protocols originally created for Apple computers.

  • application delivery controller

    An application delivery controller (ADC) is a network component that manages and optimizes how client machines connect to web and enterprise application servers.

  • Application layer

    In the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model, the application layer provides services for an application program to ensure that effective communication with another application program in a network is possible.

  • ARCNET

    ARCNET is a widely-installed local area network (LAN) technology that uses a token-bus scheme for managing line sharing among the workstations and other devices connected on the LAN.

  • ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency)

    An agency of the United States Department of Defense, ARPA (Advanced Research Projects Agency) underwrote development for the precursor of the Internet, known as ARPANET. Initially a modest network of four interconnected university computers, ARPANET's initial purpose was to enable mainly scientific users at the connected institutions to communicate and share resources.

  • ARPANET

    ARPANET was the network that became the basis for the Internet. Based on a concept first published in 1967, ARPANET was developed under the direction of the U.S. Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA). In 1969, the idea became a modest reality with the interconnection of four university computers.

  • asymmetric communications

    In telecommunications, the term asymmetric (also asymmetrical or non-symmetrical) refers to any system in which the data speed or quantity differs in one direction as compared with the other direction, averaged over time.

  • asynchronous

    In general, asynchronous (pronounced "ay-SIHN-kro-nuhs," from Greek "asyn," meaning "not with," and "chronos," meaning "time") is an adjective describing objects or events that are not coordinated in time.

  • Asynchronous Pulsed Radiated Incident Light

    Asynchronous Pulsed Radiated Incident Light is a multi-duplicitous communication protocol (MDCP) used to configure wireless local area networks (WLANs) on the fly.

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