Networking Definitions

  • A

    AAUI (Apple attachment unit interface)

    An AAUI (Apple attachment unit interface) is the 14- or 15-pin port or connection interface on earlier models of Macintosh computers that allowed it to be connected by a short interface cable (or "transceiver") to an Ethernet cable.

  • acceleration hardware

    Acceleration hardware is a general term that refers to devices that speed up data communications, storage and retrieval, encryption and decryption, mathematical operations, graphics, and Web page viewing. Acceleration hardware can consist of an individual integrated circuit (also called an IC or chip), a printed circuit card, or a self-contained system.

  • ACK

    In some digital communication protocols, ACK is the name of a signal that data has been received successfully (for example, with an acceptable number of errors).

  • acoustic coupler

    An acoustic coupler is a hardware device that enables a modem (a device that converts signals from analog to digital and from digital back to analog) to connect to a voice circuit.

  • ACTA (America's Carriers Telecommunications Association)

    ACTA (America's Carriers Telecommunications Association) is a lobbying organization for over 165 small long-distance telephone carrier companies.

  • active network

    An active network is a network in which the nodes are programmed to perform custom operations on the messages that pass through the node.

  • ACTS (Automatic Coin Telephone System)

    ACTS (Automatic Coin Telephone System) is a public coin-operated telephone service that completes a variety of phone calls, times the calls, and collects payment without the aid of an operator.

  • adaptive routing (dynamic routing)

    Adaptive routing, also called dynamic routing, is a process for determining the optimal path a data packet should follow through a network to arrive at a specific destination. Adaptive routing can be compared to a commuter taking a different route to work after learning that traffic on his usual route is backed up.

  • address

    An address can mean the unique location of either ( an Internet server, (2) a specific file (for example, a Web page), or (3) an e-mail user. It is also used to specify the location of data within computer storage.

  • Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

    Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is a protocol for mapping an Internet Protocol address (IP address) to a physical machine address that is recognized in the local network.

  • ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line)

    Also see Fast Guide to DSL. ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) is a technology for transmitting digital information at a high bandwidth on existing phone lines to homes and businesses.

  • Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN)

    The Advanced Intelligent Network (AIN) is a telephone network architecture that separates service logic from switching equipment, allowing new services to be added without having to redesign switches to support new services.

  • aggregator

    Like its synonym concentrator, an aggregator is any device that serves multiple other devices or users either with its own capabilities or by forwarding transmissions in a more concentrated and economical way.

  • akamaize

    For a Web site, to akamaize (pronounced AHK-uh-myez) is to accelerate the delivery of Web files by placing copies on servers closer to the user than the server that delivers the main file for a Web page.

  • Aloha (Aloha method)

    Aloha, also called the Aloha method, refers toa simple communications scheme in which each source (transmitter) in a network sends data wheneverthere is a frame to send.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchSDN

SearchEnterpriseWAN

SearchUnifiedCommunications

SearchMobileComputing

SearchDataCenter

SearchITChannel

Close