WLANs Definitions

  • #

    802.11a

    802.11a is one of several specifications in the 802.11 family applicable to wireless local area networks (wireless LANs or WLANs).

  • A

    Appleshare

    The AppleShare protocol is a communications protocol from Apple Computer that allows client applications in a computer to exchange files with and request services from server programs in a computer network.

  • Asynchronous Pulsed Radiated Incident Light

    Asynchronous Pulsed Radiated Incident Light is a multi-duplicitous communication protocol (MDCP) used to configure wireless local area networks (WLANs) on the fly.

  • B

    beamforming

    Beamforming is a type of RF (radio frequency) management in which an access point uses multiple antennas to send out the same signal.

  • bring your own device workplace (BYOD workplace)

    A bring your own work environment (BYOWE) is one that allows -- or even encourages -- employees to use consumer technology for job-related tasks.

  • C

    CAPWAP (Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points)

    CAPWAP (Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points) is a standardized protocol that enables wireless LAN (WLAN) controllers to centrally manage a group of wireless access points (APs).

  • CDPD (Cellular Digital Packet Data)

    CDPD (Cellular Digital Packet Data) is a specification for supporting wireless access to the Internet and other public packet-switched networks.

  • Certified Wireless Networking Professional (CWNP)

    Certified Wireless Networking Professional (CWNP)is the name for the family of wireless certifications from Planet3Wireless.

  • cognitive radio (CR)

    Cognitive radio (CR) is a form of wireless communication in which a transceiver can intelligently detect which communication channels are in use and which are not, and instantly move into vacant channels while avoiding occupied ones... (Continued)

  • CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance)

    CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) is a protocol for carrier transmission in 802.11 networks.

  • D

    DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications)

    Unlike the analog cordless phones you may have in your home, DECT (Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications) is a digital wireless telephone technology that is expected to make cordless phones much more common in both businesses and homes in the future.

  • DEN (Directory-Enabled Networking)

    Directory-Enabled Networking (DEN) is an industry-standard initiative and specification for how to construct and store information about a network's users, applications, and data in a central directory.

  • direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) or direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA)

    Direct sequence spread spectrum, also known as direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA), is one of two approaches to spread spectrum modulation for digital signal transmission over the airwaves.

  • Dynamic Source Routing (DSR)

    Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) is a self-maintaining routing protocol for wireless networks. The protocol can also function with cellular telephone systems and mobile networks with up to about 200 nodes. A Dynamic Source Routing network can configure and organize itself independently of oversight by human administrators.

  • E

    EPOC

    EPOC is an operating system designed for small, portable computer-telephones with wireless access to phone and other information services.

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