Networking Resources Definitions

  • #

    10-high-day busy period (10HD busy period)

    In designing and assessing networks, the peak load is sometimes measured using the 10HD (10-high-day) busy period method.

  • 10BASE-36

    10BASE-36 is a type of physical cabling defined in the IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet) standard for broadband application.

  • 10BASE-5

    10BASE-5, one of several physical media specified by IEEE 802.3 for use in an Ethernet local area network (LAN), consists of Thickwire coaxial cable with a maximum segment length of 500 meters.

  • 802.3

    802.3 is a standard specification for Ethernet, a method of physical communication in a local area network (LAN), which is maintained by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

  • A

    AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol)

    AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol) is a way to map between the physical hardware addresses of computers, such as those known to an Ethernet or token ring local area network, and their temporarily assigned AppleTalk network addresses.

  • ACK

    In some digital communication protocols, ACK is the name of a signal that data has been received successfully (for example, with an acceptable number of errors).

  • active network

    An active network is a network in which the nodes are programmed to perform custom operations on the messages that pass through the node.

  • ACTS (Automatic Coin Telephone System)

    ACTS (Automatic Coin Telephone System) is a public coin-operated telephone service that completes a variety of phone calls, times the calls, and collects payment without the aid of an operator.

  • address

    An address can mean the unique location of either ( an Internet server, (2) a specific file (for example, a Web page), or (3) an e-mail user. It is also used to specify the location of data within computer storage.

  • Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

    Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is a protocol for mapping an Internet Protocol address (IP address) to a physical machine address that is recognized in the local network.

  • ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line)

    Also see Fast Guide to DSL. ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) is a technology for transmitting digital information at a high bandwidth on existing phone lines to homes and businesses.

  • Aloha (Aloha method)

    Aloha, also called the Aloha method, refers toa simple communications scheme in which each source (transmitter) in a network sends data wheneverthere is a frame to send.

  • anti-replay protocol

    The anti-replay protocol is part of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) standard.

  • anycast

    In Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6), anycast is communication between a single sender and the nearest of several receivers in a group. The term exists in contradistinction to multicast, communication between a single sender and multiple receivers, and unicast, communication between a single sender and a single receiver in a network.

  • APPC (Advanced Program-to-Program Communication or LU 6.2)

    APPC (Advanced Program-to-Program Communication, sometimes called LU 6.2) is a communication protocol and programming interface standard that operates in the presentation layer and the session layer of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model.

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