Infrastructure Definitions

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    10 gigabit Ethernet (10 GbE)

    10 gigabit Ethernet is a telecommunication technology that offers data speeds up to 10 billion bits per second. It differs from traditional Ethernet in that it is a full-duplex protocol and does not require Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detection (CSMA/CD).

  • 1000BASE-T

    1000BASE-T is Gigabit Ethernet (1 gigabit is 1000 megabits per second) on copper cables, using four pairs of Category 5 unshielded twisted pair to achieve the gigabit data rate.

  • 100BASE-T

    In 100 Mbps (megabits per second) Ethernet (known as Fast Ethernet), there are three types of physical wiring that can carry signals: 100BASE-T4 (four pairs of telephone twisted pair wire) 100BASE-TX (two pairs of data grade twisted-pair wire) 100BASE-FX (a two-strand optical fiber cable) This designation is an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers shorthand identifier.

  • 10BASE-2

    10BASE-2, one of several physical media specified by IEEE 802.3 for use in an Ethernet local area network (LAN), consists of Thinwire coaxial cable with a maximum segment length of 185 meters.

  • 10BASE-36

    10BASE-36 is a type of physical cabling defined in the IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet) standard for broadband application.

  • 10BASE-5

    10BASE-5, one of several physical media specified by IEEE 802.3 for use in an Ethernet local area network (LAN), consists of Thickwire coaxial cable with a maximum segment length of 500 meters.

  • 10BASE-F

    10BASE-F, one of several physical media specified by IEEE 802.3, is the use of optical fiber in an Ethernet local area network (LAN).

  • 10BASE-T

    10BASE-T, one of several physical media specified in the IEEE 802.3 standard for Ethernet local area networks (LANs), is ordinary telephone twisted pair wire.

  • 32-bit IP addressing

    32-bit IP addressing is the IP address scheme used in Internet Protocol 4 (IPv6 uses a 128-bit system)... (Continued)

  • 802.3

    802.3 is a standard specification for Ethernet, a method of physical communication in a local area network (LAN), which is maintained by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

  • A

    A-Law

    A-Law is the standard codec (compression/decompression) algorithm for pulse code modulation (PCM) from the ITU-T (the Telecommunication Standardization Sector of the International Telecommunications Union).

  • AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol)

    AARP (AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol) is a way to map between the physical hardware addresses of computers, such as those known to an Ethernet or token ring local area network, and their temporarily assigned AppleTalk network addresses.

  • AAUI (Apple attachment unit interface)

    An AAUI (Apple attachment unit interface) is the 14- or 15-pin port or connection interface on earlier models of Macintosh computers that allowed it to be connected by a short interface cable (or "transceiver") to an Ethernet cable.

  • ACTS (Automatic Coin Telephone System)

    ACTS (Automatic Coin Telephone System) is a public coin-operated telephone service that completes a variety of phone calls, times the calls, and collects payment without the aid of an operator.

  • adaptive routing (dynamic routing)

    Adaptive routing, also called dynamic routing, is a process for determining the optimal path a data packet should follow through a network to arrive at a specific destination. Adaptive routing can be compared to a commuter taking a different route to work after learning that traffic on his usual route is backed up.

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