Definition

orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM)

Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a method of digital modulation in which a signal is split into several narrowband channels at different frequencies. The technology was first conceived in the 1960s and 1970s during research into minimizing interference among channels near each other in frequency.

In some respects, OFDM is similar to conventional frequency-division multiplexing (FDM). The difference lies in the way in which the signals are modulated and demodulated. Priority is given to minimizing the interference, or crosstalk, among the channels and symbols comprising the data stream. Less importance is placed on perfecting individual channels.

OFDM is used in European digital audio broadcast services. The technology lends itself to digital television, and is being considered as a method of obtaining high-speed digital data transmission over conventional telephone lines. It is also used in wireless local area networks.

Also see frequency-division multiplexing (FDM), time-division multiplexing (TDM), and multi-carrier modulation (MCM).

Contributor(s): Moran Ben Yair
This was last updated in April 2006
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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