Ask the Expert

What is the difference between OSI model and TCP/IP other than the number of layers?

What is the difference between OSI model and TCP/IP other than the number of layers?

    Requires Free Membership to View

OSI is a standard "reference model" that describes how protocols should interact with one another. Invented by the Department of Defense, TCP/IP became one of the "standards" that enabled the Internet to become what it is today. TCP/IP doesn't map cleanly into the OSI model, but it is convenient to think in terms of the OSI model when describing protocols.

The major differences between the OSI and TCP/IP are:

  • The application layer in TCP/IP handles the responsibilities of layers 5, 6 and 7 in the OSI model.

  • The transport layer in TCP/IP does not always guarantee reliable delivery of packets at the transport layer, while the OSI model does. TCP/IP also offers an option called UDP that does not guarantee reliable packet delivery.

Rather then reinventing the wheel here, there is a great description of the OSI model on SearchNetworking.com.

This was first published in April 2005

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to: